Quick Riddle: Playing Chess

Playing Chess

Quick Riddle: How many Fish?

Riddle Me

Quick Riddle: Who is Lying?

Who is Lying

Math Quiz that has the Internet baffled

Think you’re good with Math? Try this math quiz that has baffled the Internet!

Math Quiz

Respond by placing a comment below.

Turning The Page

Whoever thought of this was brilliant!

Turning The Page

Don’t take notes on your laptop or tablet

I know some people think I am “old school” when it comes to taking notes with pen and paper, after all, it’s 2015…

But all I care about is – RESULTS.

A recent article extols the benefits of taking notes with pen and paper and NOT on your laptop or tablet.

I admit, I am biased. I have 5 university degrees, all completed in record time. I am a speed reader. All I care about is learning quickly and remembering as much as I can.

I am a HUGE fan of technology (I have been using Macs/Apples before they became trendy 25 years ago). I do “everything” on my beloved MacBook Air and 27″ iMac Desktop… Except take notes when it’s important and I want to learn something new.

I do that on paper and with a pen – using MindMapping principles.

If you are a Millenial or younger, I can already hear the sighs of disagreement. All I can say is – SEE FOR YOURSELF.

Take one subject and take ALL your notes on your laptop and take another SIMILAR subject and take all your notes with pen and paper.

YOU decide which one produces better results:

  • Which one is quicker, easier?
  • Creates better retention/memory/recall?
  • Produces the best grades – with the least amount of effort.

Then stick to what works for YOU.

Chances are, it’s going to be pen and paper – you’ll have to accept that, or live with lower grades. Hmmm…..

 

 

Lacking Concentration? Here are the 5 Things You Need While Studying

Image Design by Freepik

Image Design by Freepik

It’s not uncommon to have difficulty concentrating while studying. You know that time is precious and you want to do well, but managing to focus and concentrate on the study tasks that need to be done can be extraordinarily hard.

The good news is that there are ways to improve your concentration and use your study time well. Most often, it is easier to concentrate when you are studying something that you love or in which you have a genuine interest, so try to keep this at the forefront of your mind when making a course selection. Scope out the study possibilities carefully – there are many fulfilling, interesting courses that can be explored and, when you study with a credible provider such as Evocca College, flexible study that culminates in a respected qualification can definitely be the result.

Here are 5 things that you need while studying:

1. A quiet, distraction-free environment

Having a place to study that is quiet is tremendously important. Not only do you need your study environment to be quiet, it should also be a place where you have the opportunity to work without interruptions. Yes, this does mean that studying at the family dinner table with people buzzing around you is less than ideal.

The place that you study should also be free from distractions. The best places for study are those that are specifically designated for study and nothing else.

2. A sensible study schedule

One of the best ways to study effectively is to create and follow a logical and realistic study schedule. Your schedule should clearly show the tasks that you need to complete and when you will devote time to each task. Without such a structure it is all too easy to lose track of time, delay important tasks and underestimate the time that you will need to thoroughly complete your study tasks.

Schedule your study according to the time(s) of day that you work most effectively. It’s important to know and work with a structure that really works for you.

3. Focus on one thing at a time

If you try to do two or more tasks at any one time, you will probably become quite frazzled. There is also a very good chance that you will not do either task particularly well. Effective concentration means that you focus exclusively on one task at a time.

4. Study when well-rested and be sure to take breaks

For optimal concentration while studying, ensure that you are not tired or hungry. If you are tired or hungry, it will be particularly hard for you to concentrate because you will lack the energy required to study effectively and concentrate well.

It’s also important that you take breaks while studying. Ideally, breaks should be taken at quite regular intervals and certainly when you are feeling fatigued.

5. Know how to break tasks into smaller components

To avoid feeling overwhelmed by large tasks (and subsequently unable to concentrate), be dedicated
to breaking large tasks into smaller tasks that can be completed one by one, step by step. This approach can really help you to tackle and concentrate while finishing tasks that initially seem insurmountable.

Finding it difficult to concentrate while studying is a feeling familiar to many students. Fortunately, there are ways to improve your concentration and be productive while studying.

 

Quick Math Quiz

Math Quiz

Submit your answer below:

The Effect of New Technology on Education

According to buyessaynow.com, technological advancements have transformed the livelihoods of people in every sector over the last century. For instance, information technology has made it easy for people to access limitless sources of information. The topic of how these new forms of technology impact on education has recently become a source of heated debates.

Some technological advancements have already been integrated in education. However, they have attracted opposition from proponents of traditional forms of education who feel that the integration would have a negative impact on the education process. This article highlights the positive and negative effects of the integration.

The Positive Impact of New Technology on Education

Technological innovations that are easy to carry like laptops, tablets and smartphones enable students to access the internet and a wide variety of electronic books. The use of these portable devices minimizes the tedious process of carrying many books to access information. Moreover, information technology has created the option of online learning which enables students to access study materials and to be taught irrespective of their geographical location.

Furthermore, studies have revealed that students who use information technology to supplement traditional forms of learning attain better grades than their counterparts who solely rely on traditional forms of learning. This is because these technological options raise the interest of students in learning.

The Negative Impact of New Technology on Education

There are various demerits of technological innovations on education. The information found on the internet is wide and varied and students usually have challenges differentiating between credible sources of information and sources that are not credible. Because of this, students may end up using information from unauthentic sources.

In addition, students are easily distracted when using these technological innovations. Studies have revealed that students who use the internet for studies are more likely to find themselves visiting nonacademic sites as opposed to students who adhere to the traditional form of classroom education.

Conclusion

The use of various forms of education has various effects on students learning. These innovations facilitate access to education by creating a platform where students can access a wide range of information without carrying numerous reading materials.

Online learning also facilitates leaning from long distances. The demerits of technological innovations include the inability of students to discern credible sources of information from the wide pool of available information. These innovations also tend to distract students easily.

Smart Phones = Dumb Students

I’ve blogged about this before numerous times… Even though I am a fan of new technologies, there is a time and place for everything – just like smartphones. Don’t just listen to me – read this brief article summarising the findings of a research study by the London School Of Economics that included 130,000 students in 91 schools.

The worst part is that the weakest students are the most affected, which will only lead to a widening gap between the two groups.

Simply put, the onus is on kids and parents to do what’s in their (the student’s) best interests. The problem is the temptation is substantial and pervasive with the ubiquity (easy access to the Internet and now 3G and 4G cellular networks).

If you are a student and you allow yourself to be constantly distracted, your grades will suffer and you might not get into the program or school you want. That might mean never becoming an engineer, doctor, lawyer, dentist…

It’s sad but it happens every single year when schools and programs REJECT applicants.

If you think you won’t be REJECTED, think again – it’s all about your grades and playing around with your smart phone when you should be listening to your teacher, doing your homework, reading, writing, researching or just thinking and concentrating on YOUR work is just plain dumb.

But you you know what?

The good news is that if YOU don’t do this – you have a greater advantage than ever!

Yes, every year your classmates play around with their phones means YOU have a better chance to get into college or that special or exclusive program. The competition will get weaker with every year – as long as YOU don’t engage in the same dumb behaviour.

The question is simple: Would you rather play with your phone NOW or spend the rest of your life/career doing the job you really enjoy?

That’s a pretty “heavy” question to be asking yourself if you’re a high school student.

Turn your phone off and think about it.

 

5 Tips for Engaging Students in Learning

Student DeskAll too often, ‘learning’ is synonymous with students being disinterested, bored, uninspired and disengaged. Although there are many distractions that can draw students’ attention away from subject content (such as smartphones, other technology and social media), there are also many great techniques that educators can use to better engage students in learning.

1. Provide them with something

In many cases, students are now provided with few tangible resources. Although many resources can be easily accessed online, many students appreciate having training materials and printed resources that they can readily and easily access – with the information that they need right in front of them in black and white.

To more effectively engage your students in their learning, give them a document such as a printed booklet in which they can write notes, highlight and identify important points, and place markers in pages. Your students will be impressed by the product they receive and, if you show that you take learning and quality course materials seriously, your students are more likely to also give their best efforts.

There are many professional companies such as The Print Group (www.theprintgroup.com.au), which can take care of printing your training materials, so don’t be afraid to outsource bigger orders.

2. Explain clearly

To students, clear, well-paced explanations are vitally important. Many students say that they are more inclined to attend classes, listen and remain attentive, if the educator gives clear explanations and does not talk too fast.

Remember that students may be trying to make notes from what you are saying, so speak clearly and at a pace that allows students to process the information and record key details.

3. Have clear learning objectives

One of the very best pieces of advice for educators is to know the outcomes you want students to achieve, and know these before you start to deliver the course. The outcomes for the course will help to determine the assessment methods and teaching approaches that are most appropriate and effective.

4. Humour helps

You will probably not be surprised to learn that humour is one of the key behaviours for capturing and increasing the attention of students in class. If you can make your classes dynamic and entertaining, while using effective presentation techniques and plenty of light and shade in your voice, your students are bound to get more from your classes.

5. Connect learning to real life

In this day and age (perhaps more than any other), learners have a thirst for knowing how their learning will be relevant and applicable to the real world and their real lives. Assisting students to draw out these connections is valuable and, if you take the time to create assessment tasks that are associated with current or future activities, you will almost surely find that your students are much more engaged and interested.

It’s important for students to feel engaged and connected if their learning is to be meaningful. Explore ways to better engage your students and you are likely to notice the benefits when these are put into practice.

Is your education worth half a million dollars?

First of all, let me share my biases with you right upfront:

  • I am not a parent
  • I have 5 university degrees
  • I have invested over $150,000 in my formal and informal education
  • I have read over 1,000 business books and over 5,000 academic and journal articles

With all that, I also can tell you that parents like to over-spend on their children’s education, just like people prefer to spend thousands on diamonds when artificial diamonds cost a fraction of the price and THE NAKED EYE CAN’T TELL THE DIFFERENCE!

A recent blog post on the costs of Australian Education brings this point home…

I see it all the time – with a $29 product to help students get the best grades with the least amount of effort – people won’t make the investment even if it’s only $29… But they spend TENS OF THOUSANDS for tuition, accommodation, etc.

Go figure…

I know what this does to parents. I have them as business clients. They have to earn $2 for every $1 they spend on their kids’ education. That means for each child, that’s +/- a million bucks/child. Frankly put, that’s mostly money flushed down the toilet. But of course you can’t tell a parent “junior’” is not the next Einstein…

So there you have it – the raw, unedited reality. Education is like any other investment – it deserves a proper Return On Investment (ROI) calculation.

ClickBank Products

My book “Get The Best Grades With The Least Amount Of Effort” is one of the top selling educational products on ClickBank.

I recently realised that not everyone knows what ClickBank is and what that actually means… So I had my graphic designer put this together to summarise it in one “infographic”.

ClickBank Infographic - Get Better Grades Now Dot Com

Improve Your Vocabulary In Any Language

This blog focuses on the general theme of getting the best grades with the least amount of effort.

One of the most frequent questions is how you can increase your vocabulary and improve sentence structure … especially in a second language.

1. Read a variety of books, magazines, articles, newspapers & stories.

Feed your brain, get it used to seeing different sentences, and a lot of text – in your chosen language. Don’t worry if most of the words appear as gibberish, soon, you’ll start to detect patterns and common phrases.

2. Often, learning is done by OSMOSIS

Here’s an example of OSMOSIS.

A friend didn’t have an accounting degree from a university. However, he worked as a costing clerk. His cubicle was in the finance department, not the accounting department.

Accounting is the collection and recording of information on all financial transactions of an entity, reporting the results of those transactions and interpreting those results. Accountin also includes the design and implementation of accounting controls to minimize errors, safeguard assets, and prevent fraud.

Finance is the function of managing the financial operations of an entity, including decisions on methods of obtaining capital, evaluating the acquisition of assets, investing idle cash, managing financial investments, collecting money from customers, paying bills and payrolls, etc. The finance function depends on the information produced by the accounting function.

There were usually between 5 and 20 accountants within the same department.

They all had different levels of accounting designations.

After more than 8 years of working alongside accountants, asking questions, participating in meetings, most of what I know about costing he learned by osmosis.

3. Write, write, write!

The more you write (and re-write your sentences) the better you will be able to communicate with others, now and throughout your academic and professional career.

Most people are challenged when it comes to communicating in writing. I see it all the time with my business clients. If you are in high school or university, this is the time you need to apply yourself.

Not being abule to right goodly its enbarrassing to say the leest.

BONUS: Subscribe to a word of the day.

Goal Setting For 2015

As a reader or subscriber to this blog, you’ll want to have a quick look at my goal setting program I call “My Best Year Ever” – it will help turn your 2015 New Year’s Resolutions into reality, to create your best year ever.

 

 

The App Generation

Today’s youth seems to be struggling with the secondary effects of technology in and out of school.

A recent Harvard Study that led to an intriguing book (The App Generation) explains the perils and pitfalls of apps that can do just about everything.*

Their argument, and I happen to totally agree with it, is that convenience comes with a loss of critical thinking skills. Others have focused on the superficiality of thinking in comparison to deep thinking about complex questions and problems. All these issues are intertwined with the ubiquity, ease of use and extensive functionality these apps provide.

The researchers and I are not advocating you abandon your apps and smartphone, but realise that there is a price being paid, like a tax every time you choose the easier way to get something done.

One easy example for people of my generation is — “back in the good ‘ole days, I could remember hundreds of phone numbers… Now I can barely remember my own number.”

Kids today struggle to do simple arithmetic and readily confuse orders of magnitude.

The point being that technology is great, but as the world continues to shift to a “knowledge-based” economy and paradigm, those with the most advanced critical thinking skills will rise to the top and dominate their industries and will be handsomely rewarded.

Suggestion: Force yourself to THINK THROUGH THINGS a little more deeply, seek the distinctions that make a difference and ASK better questions.

Here is a list to get you started, submitted by Andrew Powell of Montreal, Quebec, Canada.

6 Critical Thinking Questions

* I am going to download the book on my Kindle App and speed read it on my iPhone…

This was submitted as a response to this blog post – very funny….!

Cartoon App For TVRemote

 

 

Quick math / logic question…

What is the next number in the sequence?

Math question

Kids Learn To Code – For Free!

I just heard about this… Check it out!

Kids Code Jeunesse is a Canadian bilingual non-profit organization that aims to provide every child in Canada with the opportunity to learn to code. They provide schools with trained volunteers who teach kids and their teachers computer programming in the classroom.

What a great idea!

Don’t get a degree!

Last week I blogged about the value of getting a degree, this week, have a look at the counter-argument… Don’t bother to get a degree!

Make sure you scroll all the way down to the end of the page for the “WARNING” if you choose not to get a degree!

You might not like school, but…

You don’t really have a choice… please keep reading what the statistics reveal about staying in school…

High school graduation rates reached a record high of 80% in 2012!

That would be great news, if it wasn’t for the fact that this “record-high” rate meant a full 20%, or one in five kids, didn’t finish the most basic level of education.

It’s possible that those who didn’t graduate got a General Education Development (GED) certificate instead, or will at a later point, but people with a GED tend to fare as well economically as those who got neither a diploma nor a GED.

So while reaching the 80% mark might be a move in the right direction, this is not a number that brings a lot of cheer.

And then there’s college… The percentage of the population with a college degree has continued to grow, albeit slowly, for decades. This trend is coming to an end because the percentage of high school graduates enrolling in college has rolled over.

After reaching a high point of 70% in 2009, only 66% of these kids enrolled in college in 2013. There’s an argument to be made that in years past, too many kids were entering college.

They simply went to college because everyone else did, but lacked direction, preparation, or both. Given the cost of college, the recent economic downturn caused many families to re-evaluate if pursuing higher education was the right choice.

This is a great development, but it was brought on by a tough situation.

Now there are a few more kids (in the United States) that are getting all the way through high school, but fewer young people entering college, so there are more people getting off the education train in the middle.

Unfortunately, this isn’t translating into more employment. While recent US college graduates work to find jobs in their field, recent high school graduates struggle to find any employment. Those without high school diplomas are being left behind in record numbers.

In the late 1990s, over 80% of those with just a high school diploma were participating in the labor force (either employed or looking for work) the year after graduation, and roughly 70% had jobs.

By the early 2000s, participation in the labor force — the year after graduation — had dropped to around 78%, while employment had fallen to 60%. Over the decade, participation dropped well below 70%.

Now, with a slight upturn after the massive drop in employment during the financial crisis, labor force participation is back up to 74% while employment is at 51%.

The net effect is that unemployment the year after high school — among those with just a high school diploma — was running at 10% in the 1990s, and is currently at 23%.

As noted above, for those who didn’t graduate high school, it’s worse. That group had a roughly 65% labor force participation rate the year after high school in the late 1990s, while their employment rate was near 50%.

But the numbers have fallen dramatically since then, and have not staged much of a recovery. At the end of 2013, only 43% of this group was either employed or actively seeking employment, with 31% holding down a job.

Oddly, this makes the unemployment rate of this group — around 12% — look better than that of high school graduates, but that’s misleading. The key is that only 43% are participating in the labor force.

Where are the rest of them?

In the year after high school, where are the 26% of graduates not participating in the labor force, and where are the 57% of those who didn’t receive a diploma who aren’t participating in the labor force?

These kids get lumped in with others who don’t count toward labor force participation rates, like retirees and homemakers, but the differences are obvious. These young people are not on a path to a productive life.

It doesn’t mean they can’t or won’t get there; it simply means that they’re not on that path today.

This is part of where the sluggish employment situation shows up. Employees have a tough time getting raises.

Those with skills and experience can get jobs, but the inexperienced college graduates are taking positions outside of their fields of study, and often in jobs that don’t require college degrees.

This pushes high school graduates out of the running for such jobs, and kicks those without a high school diploma out of the equation.

With one in five young people not achieving a high school diploma, we can expect a very large social issue to erupt in the years ahead because this group will have little work experience, and little ability to establish and grow their own household.