Archive for the 'Graduation' Category

Don’t get a degree!

Last week I blogged about the value of getting a degree, this week, have a look at the counter-argument… Don’t bother to get a degree!

Make sure you scroll all the way down to the end of the page for the “WARNING” if you choose not to get a degree!

NOT staying in school is not a (financial) option

As college graduates take to the street, searching for the first jobs of their careers, many are unsure if it was worth it.

Recent statistics reveal college grads made 98% more an hour on average than people without a degree in 2013, which is up from 89% in 2008 and 64% in the early ’80s.

But since the numbers are based on averages, we need to look at the details to see there are big differences in experience among individuals within groups of both graduates and non-graduates.

There is no question the pay gap between the college educated and everyone else is getting bigger.

It’s also true that the unemployment rate for college graduates right now, is remarkably low. For college grads between ages 25 and 34, the unemployment rate is currently around 3%!

Here is the paradox:

College grads are not making headway;
instead non-graduates are losing ground.

The income paid to college grads, on average, has remained flat,
but the wages of non-graduates have fallen.

To look at it a different way, college graduates are now taking jobs away from non-graduates. This reality is reflected in several recent studies and in U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics data. According to The Center for College Affordability and Productivity, in 2008 roughly 38% of working college graduates were in positions that didn’t require a degree. By 2013, that number had increased to 48%.

Not every Starbucks barista is a college graduate, but many of them are.

So what happens to you if you are a non-graduate who didn’t get that job?

It’s unlikely you will be moving up in the corporate world, skipping over all those college graduates to take higher-paying positions above them.

Don’t blame employers for this. If an open position doesn’t require a college degree, but 50 out of 200 applicants have a degree, why wouldn’t they choose a college graduate?

That’s why you need to STAY IN SCHOOL and graduate, your financial future depends on it.

No one said it was fair, it’s just the way it is.

Of course if you have a college degree – YOU WANT THIS ADVANTAGE over non-graduates – don’t you?!?!

Gap Year Infographic

Gap year trips are very popular – this great infographic reveals some interesting stats… Enjoy!

An infographic by World First

Tweets – they might prevent you from getting into college

If you read my other blogs, you know I am not a fan of social media, including Twitter and Facebook. It isn’t just because I think they are an incredible waste of time, but primarily because of the privacy violation aspects. You can about that on my Internet Marketing Blog and search for Privacy Pirates to learn more

Since this blog is focused on students, you should read this New York Times article on the cost of students tweeting indiscriminately. It could prevent you from getting into the college you want.

I always tell people – if you don’t want your tweet on the front page of tomorrow’s newspaper – don’t do it!




Why you are “in school” is not the reason you might think…

Recently, George, an engineering student in Egypt, was sharing with me his challenges with school. He is making the mistake many students make, thinking they are in school to learn calculus, chemistry or any other “subject” matter.

The reality is that you are a student in high school and/or university for one reason only – to learn HOW to learn…

Depending on what you are studying, you will acquire and develop different learning (cognitive skills).

Engineers learn problem solving skills.
Lawyers learn interpretive skills.
Doctors learn diagnostic skills.

Once you realise this, your life as a student changes.

If you are in high school or university, you may INTEND to practice engineering, medicine or law, but the reality is that most students do something ELSE with the education following graduation. Once they launch their careers, they leverage their acquired skills to the extent they developed them WHILE they were students. The paradox is that unless you study like an engineer, doctor or lawyer, you simply cannot (as easily) acquire THOSE particular skills. You need to develop those skills WHILE you are a student…

When you study across disciplines as I have, social science, engineering, business and law, you realise that each skill set has its place in society.

The BIG question for you to ask yourself as a student is – “what skill(s) do you want to have once you graduate?”

Is your lack of a degree holding you back from career advancement?

Then maybe what you need is a degree, diploma, certificate or accreditation..

Seriously, sometimes the right piece of paper can make all the difference. In the food industry, a food hygiene or food safety supervisor course can be a foot in the door. In the professional fields, Continuing Professional Development (CPD) Credits are a popular way for engineers, dentists, accountants and lawyers to keep up to date and advance their careers.

There is nothing worse than missing a critical element to practice the career you’ve always dreamed of, but even if you are in your chosen profession or industry, you can find yourself stuck or held back from the career fast track just because you don’t have the diploma or certificate that’s needed.

There was a time when an MBA was a ticket to business success – now with specialisations, there are a multitude of options that the serious career person needs to evaluate and assess.

Not everyone is going to get 5 university degrees like I did, across multiple disciplines including engineering, law, business, corporate governance and ecommerce. That’s not really the point.

The point is for you to find the missing piece of the puzzle that permits you to get to the ultimate job, position or role you aspire to. Maybe it’s the corner office with a fabulous view or it’s an international role that allows you to travel the world or it can be a domestic role that provides to your local community.

Have a look at they might be able to help.

Mark Wahlberg goes back to high school

Marky Mark, Mark Wahlberg Back To SchoolI stumbled across an article that said Mark Wahlberg is going to get his high school diploma.  What does it tell you when a multi-millionaire actor wants a high school diploma?

It means there is value in getting one. This is a man who’s seen more of the world than most and experienced things to fill 3 or 4 lifetimes yet he still feels a little intimidated by the process.

What does that tell you?

Education is worth something. It’s not just self-esteem issue. The stats are staggering, but let’s face it, most high school dropouts don’t care about the stats, but they might care about a RICH, SUCCESSFUL ACTOR going back to school.

So there you have it – ONE MORE REASON TO STAY IN SCHOOL!

Marina Keegan Yale Student Essay

Yale grad’s final essay gets new life after her unexpected death

Marina Keegan, Yale Student, Yale Essay

Marina Keegan Yale Student/Writer

This undated photo released by the Keegan family shows Marina, a 22-year-old Yale graduate, who penned her life’s lessons in a final column for the Yale Daily News. She died just days after commencement.

But the words of her work, “The Opposite of Loneliness,” have lived on.

The Massachusetts resident died in a car crash on her way to a vacation house on Cape Cod when the driver, Michael Gocksch, lost control of the car. Gocksch survived, but Keegan was pronounced dead on the scene.

The young writer was already making a name for herself in the literary world. She had published stories in the New York Times and had a job with the New Yorker she was about to start.

Her legacy is priceless and timeless and I share it with you here because all students have bouts of self-doubt, loneliness and apprehension about what student life is all about.

Take solace is Marina’s words of wisdom, they are her legacy and gift to you.