Monthly Archive for November, 2020

Why Burying Yourself in Textbooks Isn’t the Way to Better Grades

Academic pressure is real. It’s an evolving concept that has plagued many students worldwide, simply because of the belief that high educational attainment is the solution to life’s greatest problems. While there’s a bit of truth in that, your grades aren’t the sole determinant of your future. Another truth you have to accept is that your all-work-no-play approach to your studies is doing you more harm than good.

When academic pressure reaches a tipping point, you risk experiencing depression, anxiety, and a loss of motivation. The trick is an over-familiar antidote: balance. Whether you like the sound of it or not doesn’t matter. A balanced study life is the way to go, and this article will break down the top three reasons why.

Your Brain Needs Rest

Like so many of your peers, you wear your exhaustion as a badge of honor. It’s proof that you’re going the extra mile for that grade, and there’s no room in your day for rest. Psychologist ScottBea,PsyDsays that today’s culture has made”downtime”a dirty word when it’s exactly what the brain needs to function better. He compares the brain to a sponge, which needs to dry out before absorbing new information. An overworked brain is unlikely to process data well, and the only way to fix it is to indulge in some downtime.

Research shows that resting can improve your concentration, performance, and mood. Refusing to step away from your textbooks will not only result in the exact opposite. It can also lead to chronic stress and a feeling of being burned out. It’s more difficult to recover when you’ve reached that point, so before you feel as though you can’t read another word about Postmodernism, go ahead and doze off.

Studying isn’t the Only Way

Developing the ability to recall information better and concentrate more in class is integral to successful students. Polish these skills by attending piano lessons. Learning how to play the piano is a great way to take a break from your textbooks, as well as to hone those much-needed cognitive skills.

Would it be too far-fetched to say it also makes you smarter? Not really, because studies confirm that it activates parts of the brain used in math and spatial reasoning. Its positive impact on your spatial-temporal ability can lead to better grades in math and science.

You’ll find that, in the course of mastering piano pieces, you’ve also developed your discipline and perseverance. Just because it won’t further your knowledge on the Pythagorean Theorem or the solar system doesn’t mean it’s a waste of time. It might just be exactly what you need to develop better study habits.

Motivation and Inspiration are Integral

Motivation is what moves you to do something. Academic pressure is neither a healthy motivation nor a lasting one. What you need is a personal drive to continue learning difficult terminologies and mastering math formulas. When reflecting on your motivations, think about your desires for the future. A successful career is a given. What about traveling all over the globe? Contributing to organizations that fight climate change? Moving out of your parents’ house and creating a space of your own?

Find things that inspire you, like a painting, a photograph, or a book. You’ll hear people say that inspiration is overrated, but it’s intrinsically linked to motivation; therefore, it’s important. Identifying the”why’s”of your life might give you the extra kick you need to focus on your studies.

Life is More Than Your Grades

Perhaps the biggest lie that pressures you to do well in school is that your grades define you. By no means. Do your best to succeed academically because it is important, but don’t forget your other passions. Make time for your hobbies and invest in your relationships. A balanced life is a happy life, and that’s what you must ultimately be after.